Rose Hips


"Second in quality only to grape wines."

There are dozens of varieties of wild rose throughout the word, with more than two dozen in the United States. Additionally, there are thousands of varieties of domesticated roses. All produce fruit called hips in which the seeds develop. The hips develop slowly during the summer, turn orange in late August and September, and then turn red around October. They are ripe and ready to pick when red.

Rose hip wine is considered by some to be second in quality only to grape wines. Others may feel less strongly about it, but all agree that a good, mature rose hip wine is very good indeed. Pick 2 to 3-1/2 pounds of rose hips per gallon of wine. The bottled wine must age at LEAST two years to mature to its potential. Young rose hip wine will be almost undrinkable.


ROSE HIP WINE (1)



Put the water on to boil. Meanwhile, cut the stems and ends off the rose hips. Chop the hips coarsely, put in nylon straining bag, and tie bag closed. Put bag and sugar in primary. Pour boiling water over these and stir well to dissolce sugar. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add pectic enzyme, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Recover and set aside 12 hours. Add yeast. Stir twice daily for 8-9 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract juice. Pour juice into secondary. Fit airlock and set in dark place for 6 weeks. Rack into sterilized secondary, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place and rack again after 3 months, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place for 3 months. If wine has not cleared, fine with gelatin, wait two weeks, and rack again. When clear, bottle. Age additional 18-24 months in dark place. [Adapted recipe from Steven A. Krause's Making Wines from the Wild]


ROSE HIP WINE (2)



Put the water with sugar in it on to boil. Meanwhile, wash and inspect the rose hips for insects. Chop the hips coarsely in a blender or food chopper, put in nylon straining bag, and tie bag closed. Put bag in primary and pour boiling sugar-water over bag. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add pectic enzyme, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Recover and set aside 12 hours. Add yeast. Stir and squeeze the bag twice daily for 8-9 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract juice. Pour juice into secondary. Fit airlock and set in dark place for 2 months. Rack into sterilized secondary, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place and rack again after 4 months, top up and refit airlock. When clear, stabilize wine and sweeten to taste. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Age additional 18-24 months in dark place. [Adapted recipe from Terry Garey's The Joy of Home Winemaking]


ROSE HIP WINE (3)



Crush the dried rose hips, rinse and soak in water overnight. Put sugar in water and set on stove to boil. Meanwhile, drain, put in nylon straining bag and tie closed. Put bag in primary and pour boiling sugar-water over bag. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add pectic enzyme, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Recover and set aside 12 hours. Add yeast. Stir and squeeze the bag twice daily for 8-10 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract flavor. Pour liquid into secondary. Fit airlock and set in dark place for 2 months. Rack into sterilized secondary, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place and rack again after additional 2 months, top up and refit airlock. When wine clears, stabilize wine and sweeten to taste. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Age additional two years in dark place. [Author's own recipe]



This page was updated on September 26th, 2003

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