horizontal divider


Site Banner


Requested Recipe:

CALENDULA WINE


"I was given a bottle of Calendula Wine. It was delicious, but I don't know
what it is. Do you have any idea, and how to make Calendula Wine?"
Adrianne Forsythe, Waterford, CT




CALENDULA


I have made calendula wine. Calendula is better known as marigold, although as an herb it is known by it's Latin name. The dried petals are sold at health food stores for tea, and thus can be had any time of the year. Thus, I consider calendula wine to be different from marigold wine, as the former is made from the dried petals and the latter from the fresh,

I make this wine semi-sweet with 11.4% alcohol.

Calendula Wine

Put 3 pints water on to boil. Dissolve sugar in water. Put petals in nylon straining bag with 3-4 glass marbles, tie closed and put in primary. Pour boiling water over petals. Add remaining water, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When at room temperature, add Campden tablet (finely crushed and dissolved in some water), recover primary, and set aside for 10-12 hours. Add activated yeast. Recover primary. When specific gravity drops to 1.015 or lower, transfer to secondary fermentation vessel and attach airlock. Recipe makes slightly more than one gallon so put extra in small sanitized bottle (use later for topping up) and attach airlock (#3 bung fits all wine bottles down to 125 mL). Wait until all fermentation ceases and airlock is still for two weeks, then rack into clean secondary, top up and refit airlock. Wait additional 30 days and add another finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet and 1/3 teaspoon potassium sorbate to clean secondary, rack wine onto it, top up and refit airlock. Wait 30 days, sweeten to 1.006 s.g. or to taste, and bottle. Wait two months before tasting for bouquet to develop. [Author's own recipe.]


My thanks to Adrianne Forsythe for requesting this recipe.

Google

This page was updated December 24th, 2005

If our website has helped you in your wine or mead making endeavors,
and you feel moved to contribute to help offset our expenses, you may...




Home Page Prelude My Approach Getting Started Glossary of Terms Search This Site
The Basic Steps Advanced Winemaking All About Yeast Using Your Hydrometer Winemaker's Library Winemaking Links
Winemaking Recipes Requested Recipes Winemaking in Texas Wines From Edible Plants Native North American Grapes Visitor-Submitted Recipes
Wine Labels Conversions and Equivalents Measuring Additives Winemaking Problems Jack's WineBlog The Author