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Requested Recipe:

BLACKBERRY PORT WINE

"I thought about trying to make blackberry wine, or better yet a blackberry port.
...[H]ow would you modify the recipe for making a port?" Jered Stoehr, Pacific Northwest




BLACKBERRY PORT


Blackberries are a wonderful fruit. They are delicious raw, cooked (compote, jam, jelly, or syrup), baked (cobbler anyone?), or fermented to mead, wine or port. While blackberry wine is a favorite of almost everyone, blackberry port is seldom made. I asked a friend once, whose blackberry wine was consistently so good that he only had to enter it in competitions to win, if he ever made blackberry port. He replied, "Nope. It takes twice as many blackberries to make port and I'd rather have twice as much wine." Well, you can't argue with that logic, but blackberry port is certainly worth the sacrifice of the extra berries. The recipe below is for one gallon.


Blackberry Port Wine


Wash and crush blackberries in nylon straining bag and strain juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie top of nylon bag and place in primary. Stir in all other ingredients except pectic enzyme, yeast and red grape concentrate. Stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 8-12 hours. Add pectic enzyme, recover, and set aside additional 8-12 hours. Add yeast, cover, stir ingredients daily, and press pulp in nylon bag to extract flavor. When specific gravity is 1.030 (about 5 days), strain juice from bag and siphon liquor off sediments into secondary fermentation vessel. Fit airlock and set aside. Rack in three weeks and again in two months. When wine is clear and well past last evidence of fermentation, stabilize, add red grape concentrate, and set aside for 3 weeks. If no evidence of refermentation, rack again and bottle. Allow at least a year to mature, but will improve for several years. [Author's own recipe]



My thanks to Jered Stoehr in the great Pacific Northwest for this request.


This page was updated August 19th, 2003

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