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Requested Recipe:

SNAP OR STRING BEAN WINE


"My wife grows a lot of runner beans (long green beans). Have you got a reciepe for these?" John & Julie, UK.



SNAP OR STRING BEANS


Snap beans, string beans, runner beans (Phaseolus ssp.), are all related and very similar. These are the typical garden green beans grown everywhere, and yes, believe it or not, they can be made into a wine. Pea pod wine is made from the pods only, and this wine too can be made from just the pods, but because they are typically harvested green and the pods do not open easily to release the beans contained therein, the whole thing (pod and beans) is usually used in the winemaking process. This wine is not to everyone's liking, but it is wine and some folks have a natural affinity for it.


SNAP OR STRING BEAN WINE

Wash beans. No need to remove stems. Cut beans diagonally into 2-inch pieces, so as to expose more of the interior of the fleshy pod. Put in pot, just cover with water, and bring to a simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, chop or mince white or golden raisins. Put 7 pints water in separtate pot and bring to boil. Stir sugar into water until dissolved and set aside. Strain beans (discarding their water), place in nylon straining bag, and tie bag closed. Tie chopped or minced raisins in separate bag and tie closed. Place both bags in primary and pour sugar water over bags. Add yeast nutrient, acid blend and tannin, stir and cover primary. Set aside to cool. Add pectic enzyme, stir and set aside (covered) for 12 hours. Add activated yeast. Stir daily, squeezing ONLY the bag of raisins. After two weeks, drip drain bag with beans, saving drippings, and discard the beans. Gently squeeze raisins and discard pulp. Transfer combined liquids to secondary and attach airlock. Rack every 2 months for 6 months, topping up and reattaching airlock each time. Wine should clear, but if it doesn't, then treat with Amylase or starch enzyme. Stabilize when clear and no longer depositing sediments. Sweeten if desired, wait 14 days and bottle. Age one year before tasting. [Author's recipe.]


My thanks to John and Julie in the United Kingdom for this request.

This page was updated on November 14th, 2001

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