horizontal divider



Requested Recipe:

WHITECURRANT WINES


"I have a lot of frozen white currants and am looking for a recipe for white currant wine. Do you have one?"
Candice Mayfield, Chicago




WHITECURRANTS


Whitecurrants (also spelled "white currants") are of the genus Ribes. Most North American currants are of the black or red varieties, with whitecurrants having been imported from Europe. Some have escaped cultivation and are occasionally found in the wild, but usually they are cultivated. Popular varieties are Bianca, Tinka (actually a pink currant, but sometimes referred to as a white), White Dutch, White Imperial, White Pearl, and White Versailles.

The richest and sweetest flavored of the whitecurrants is the White Imperial. It forms loose clusters of medium to large fruit which is white and translucent. Seeds are visible through the translucuent skin and flesh and are brown. These ripen in mid-July and are hardy to Zone 3. White Pearl is another large berry with translucent skin, although it is pale yellow in color. It has a mild, sweet flavor and is also hardy to Zone 3. It is believed to be from Belgium and cultivated since at least 1850 or is from Holland.

WHITECURRANT WINE (1)

Put the fruit in primary and crush. Add 1 quart water, crushed Campden tablet and yeast nutrient and stir. Meanwhile, add half the sugar to 1 quart water and bring to boil while stirring to dissolve. Add to primary and stir. Cover and allow to cool overnight. Add activated yeast, recover, and stir daily for 5-6 days. Strain through nylon sieve and transfer juice to sanitized secondary and fit airlock. Bring another quart of water to boil and stir in remainder of sugar until dissolved. When cool, add to secondary and refit airlock. After 3 additional days, top up with water, refit airlock and set aside until fermentation stops. Rack, top up and refit airlock. After 60 days, rack again, top up and refit airlock. After additional 60 days, rack into bottles and age 6 months before tasting. [Adapted from H.E. Bravery's Amateur Wine-Making]


WHITECURRANT WINE (2)

Put the fruit in primary and crush. Add 1 quart water and crushed Campden tablet and stir. Cover and set aside for 12 hours. Strain pulp through nylon straining bag, squeezing firmly. Suspend a jelly bag over a bowl and pour the strained juice into the bag. Allow this to drip-drain without squeezing. Do not rush. When all juice is through, pour into stainless steel saucepan and bring to boil. Reduce to simmer and hold for 5 minutes, removing any scum that rises. Meanwhile, add half the sugar to 1 quart of water and bring to boil while stirring to dissolve. Pour both the sugar-water and boiled juice into clean primary, stir in yeast nutrient, cover, and set aside to cool. Add activated yeast, recover and stir daily for 10 days. Bring another quart of water to boil and stir in remaining sugar until dissolved. Set aside to cool and then add to primary. Cover as before and set aside another 3-4 days. Transfer to secondary, top up with water and fit airlock. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 30 days until wine clears and leaves no further deposits. Stabilize, bulk age 3 months under airlock, and rack into bottles. Age 6 months before tasting. WARNING: Do not boil juice until it has passed through jelly-bag without squeezing or wine will not clear. [Adapted from H.E. Bravery's Amateur Wine-Making]


WHITECURRANT WINE (3)

Put the fruit in primary and crush. Add 1 quart water, crushed Campden tablet and yeast nutrient and stir. Meanwhile, add half the sugar to 1 quart water and bring to boil while stirring to dissolve. Add to primary and stir. Cover and allow to cool overnight. Add activated yeast, recover, and stir daily for 5-6 days. Strain through nylon sieve and transfer juice to sanitized secondary and fit airlock. Bring another quart of water to boil and stir in remainder of sugar until dissolved. When cool, add to secondary and refit airlock. After 3 additional days, top up with water, refit airlock and set aside until fermentation stops. Rack, top up and refit airlock. After 60 days, rack again, top up and refit airlock. After additional 60 days, rack into bottles and age 6 months before tasting. [Adapted from H.E. Bravery's Amateur Wine-Making]


My thanks to Candice Mayfield of Chicago, Illinois for requesting this recipe.


This page was updated on November 28th, 2000

If our website has helped you in your wine or mead making endeavors
and you feel moved to contribute to help offset our expenses, you may...


Home Page Prelude My Approach Getting Started Glossary of Terms Search This Site
The Basic Steps Advanced Winemaking All About Yeast Using Your Hydrometer Winemaker's Library Winemaking Links
Winemaking Recipes Requested Recipes Winemaking in Texas Wines From Edible Plants Native North American Grapes Visitor-Submitted Recipes
Wine Labels Conversions and Equivalents Measuring Additives Winemaking Problems Jack's WineBlog The Author