horizontal divider



Requested Recipe:

MARIGOLD WINE


"Do you have a recipe for marigold wine?" Matt Lukowsky, Pennsylvania




MARIGOLDS


Marigolds make an excellent, richly flavored wine. As with dandelions, only the petals are used. The petals may be frozen for short periods until enough are collected to make a batch.


MARIGOLD WINE

Put water on to boil, stirring sugar in until dissolved. Prepare zest of orange and lemon peel and then extract the juices from the pulp. Put marigold petals, chopped raisins and zest of orange and lemon in nylon straining bag and tie closed. Put in primary with tartaric acid and yeast nutrient and pour boiling water over bag. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature or slightly warm, add activated yeast. Recover primary and gently squeeze bag twice a day for 5-6 days. Squeeze bag to extract liquid, discard contents of bag, and recover primary. Allow to settle overnight and rack into secondary. Fit airlock and set aside to continue fermentation. Rack, top up and refit airlock after 30 days, then again after additional 60 days. Set in cool place 4 months, checking airlock periodically for seal. Rack, stabilize and sweeten to taste if desired, but this wine is very good dry. If sweetened, set aside additional 14 days to check for signs of refermentation. If none or if wine is not sweetened, carefully rack into bottles and cellar 12 months before tasting. [Author's own recipe]


My thanks to Matt Lukowsky of Pennsylvania for requesting this recipe.


This page was updated on September 26th, 2000

If our website has helped you in your wine or mead making endeavors,
and you feel moved to contribute to help offset our expenses, you may...




Home Page Prelude My Approach Getting Started Glossary of Terms Search This Site
The Basic Steps Advanced Winemaking All About Yeast Using Your Hydrometer Winemaker's Library Winemaking Links
Winemaking Recipes Requested Recipes Winemaking in Texas Wines From Edible Plants Native North American Grapes Visitor-Submitted Recipes
Wine Labels Conversions and Equivalents Measuring Additives Winemaking Problems Jack's WineBlog The Author