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Requested Recipe:

KIWI FRUIT WINES


"I've just come across your web page and I find the most
useful one yet!... I am wondering if you could help me find a
suitable recipe for Kiwifruit wine."
Val Williamson, Te Puke, New Zealand




KIWI FRUIT


Kiwi fruit form on the vines of Actinida chinensis. The fuzzy fruit come in two varieties. The common KiwiGreen is an acidic fruit while the KiwiGold is a much sweeter and less acidic variety. The latter tastes like a cross between a banana and a mellon. Each makes an excellent white table wine. A recipe for each is found below. each recipe is for one U.S. gallon.


Kiwi Fruit Wine (1)

Mix sugar into the water and put on stove to boil, stirring occasionally to dissolve. Meanwhile, thinly peel and coarsely chop fruit and place in nylon straining bag. Tie bag closed and put in primary. Crush fruit with hands. Add acid blend, tannin and yeast nutrients to primary and pour boiling water over fruit when all sugar is dissolved. Cover with clean cloth and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add pectic enzyme and stir. Recover primary and wait 12 hours. Add activated yeast and recover primary. Stir daily, lifting and dunking bag of fruit pulp several times (do NOT squeeze bag) before stirring. After 7 days, remove bag and drip drain without squeezing for about an hour. Return drained juices to primary and discard pulp. When specific gravity drops below 1.015, rack into secondary and fit airlock. Rack after 3 months, top up and refit airlock, and repeat after additional 3 months. Wine should be clear and completely dry. If wine is too dry for your taste, stabilize, sweeten to your liking, refit airlock and set aside. After 10 days, rack into bottles and set aside to age another 6 months. Serve lightly chilled. [Adapted from Terry Garey's The Joy of Home Winemaking]


Kiwi Fruit Wine (2)

Mix sugar into the water and put on stove to boil, stirring occasionally to dissolve. Meanwhile, thinly peel and coarsely chop fruit and place in nylon straining bag. Tie bag closed and put in primary. Crush fruit with hands. Add acid blend, tannin and yeast nutrients to primary and pour boiling water over fruit when all sugar is dissolved. Cover with clean cloth and set aside to cool. When room temperature, check specific gravity to ensure it is between 1.080-1.090 (correct if required) and then add pectic enzyme and stir. Recover primary and wait 12 hours. Add activated yeast and recover primary. Stir daily, lifting and dunking bag of fruit pulp several times (do NOT squeeze bag) before stirring. After 7 days, remove bag and drip drain without squeezing for about an hour. Return drained juices to primary and discard pulp. When specific gravity drops below 1.015, rack into secondary and fit airlock. Rack after 3 months, top up and refit airlock, and repeat after additional 3 months. Wine should be clear and completely dry. If wine is too dry for your taste, stabilize, sweeten to your liking, refit airlock and set aside. After 10 days, rack into bottles and set aside to age another 6 months. Serve lightly chilled. [Adapted from Terry Garey's The Joy of Home Winemaking]


My thanks to Val Williamson of Te Puke, New Zealand for this request.

This page was updated on February 1st, 2000

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