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Requested Recipe:

ORANGE WINES


"Can wine be made from oranges?" Jannie van der Westhuisen




ORANGES


Most certainly wine can be made from oranges. I have several recipes for orange wine, but will only cite the two below because the others are essentially variations on these two. A third recipe, for Seville Orange Wine, is available upon request. I do not include it here because Seville oranges, those very tart oranges from which most quality marmalade is made, are quite rare in North America and I don't want to confuse readers.

I have not tried the first recipe below, so cannot attest to it as being good or otherwise. But I have tried the second, and it makes a very good wine. I used very sweet Valencia oranges.


Orange Wine (1)

Use over-ripe oranges only. You can usually get these from your grocer at reduced prices (or even free). If they have bad spots on them (moldy or soft) it will not matter. Put two quarts of water on to boil. Meanwhile, peel the oranges and remove all the white pith (it is bitter and will ruin the wine). Break the oranges into sections and remove all seeds. Drop them in a juicer or a blender and liquefy (you may have to add a cup of water to the blender). Mix the juice or liquefied oranges with the sugar, tannin and yeast nutrient in primary. Add boiling water and stir well to dissolve the sugar. Add additional water if necessary to make one gallon total must. Cover and set aside to cool. When cooled to 70-75 degrees F., add yeast. Ferment 7-10 days and strain through a fine-meshed nylon straining bag, squeezing to extract juice from pulp. Transfer to secondary and fit airlock. Rack every 30 days for three months. Stabilize and sweeten to taste. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Age one year before tasting. [Adapted from Mrs. Gennery-Taylor's "Easy to Make Wine"]


Orange Wine (2)

Put two quarts of water on to boil. Meanwhile, peel the oranges and remove all the white pith (it is bitter and will ruin the wine). Break the oranges into sections and remove all seeds. Drop them in a juicer or a blender and liquefy (you may have to add a cup of water to the blender). Peel and slice bananas and simmer in one pint of water for 20 minutes. In a primary, add chopped or minced raisins (or sultanas), 2-1/2 lbs of the sugar, the orange juice or liquefied orange pulp, and two quarts of boiling water. Stir well to dissolve sugar. Over primary, pour simmering banana slices into nylon straining bag and allow to drip until cool enough to squeeze. Squeeze lightly and then discard banana flesh. Stir in tannin and yeast nutrient and enough water to make up one gallon total. Cover with cloth and set aside to cool. When cooled to room temperature, add pectic enzyme, recover and wait 12 hours. Add wine yeast. Ferment 7 days, add remaining sugar, stir to dissolve, and ferment another 3 days. Rack off sediments into secondary and fit airlock. Rack every 30 days for 3 months. Stabilize and sweeten to taste. After additional 10 days, rack into bottles and set aside one year to age. [Adapted from Brian Leverett's "Winemaking Month by Month"]


My thanks to Jannie van der Westhuisen for the request.


This page was updated on May 3rd, 1999

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