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Requested Recipe:

Anjou and Flemish Beauty Pears


"We have Anjou and Flemish Beauty Pear trees,
which give us more pears than we can eat and give away.
Can you send us some recipes for using them in winemaking?"

John and Doretta Moore




Anjou and Flemish Pears


I remember finding a recipe for mashed potatoes with roasted Flemish pears and sausages. The uncommon combination featured Italian sausage, dry pear wine, garlic, shallots, red bell peppers, basil, crushed red pepper and olive oil. I had to substitute Bartlett pears for the Flemish, but man, oh man, I never looked at a pear the same way again!

The Beurre d'Anjou, or Pyrus communis, is an interesting variety that has no superior when it comes to appearance and quality. Unlike many other varieties of pears, d'Anjou is neither self-fruitful nor does it set fruit parthenocarpically. Thus, it relies mostly on other pear varieties for pollination. John and Doretta are lucky to have a Flemish Beauty tree to compliment their Anjou, as the two polinate at roughly the same time.

The d'Anjou pear hangs on the tree longer than most table varieties and only ripens after being picked and set in cold storage for a month or more. The freshly picked d'Anjou pears can be made into wine, but will not have the flavor of those set aside to ripen properly.

I could not find any information on Flemish Beauty pears, so cannot comment further on them. I am confident, however, that their sugar content is similar to the d'Anjou and may be made according to the following recipes. The first recipe is for a dry cooking wine. The second is for a sweeter sipping wine and includes golden raisins for added body.


DRY ANJOU PEAR WINE (1)

Boil the water and dissolve the sugar. Wash, destem and core the pears, being sure to remove all seeds. Chop roughly and put in nylon straining bag. Tie bag and put in primary. Mash pears using potato masher, blunt end of a baseball bat, or a 4X4 piece of wood (be sure to sterilze whatever is used to mash pears). Pour boiling water over crushed pears. Add crushed Campden tablet, acid blend, tannin and yeast nutrient. Wait 12 hours and add pectic enzyme. Wait another 12 hours and add yeast. Cover with muslin. Stir daily, squeezing bag to extract flavor. After 7 days, remove bag and let drip drain one hour. Do not squeeze. Return drained juice to primary and allow to settle 24 hours. Siphon into glass secondary, fit airlock, and set aside. Rack after two weeks, top up, and refit airlock. Rack again every two months (but at least twice) until wine clears. Rack again, bottle and age 6-12 months. Use for cooking and salad dressings, or stir 1/2 to 3/4 tsp honey into glass of wine for sipping. [Adapted traditional recipe]


SWEET ANJOU PEAR WINE (2)

Boil the water and dissolve the sugar. Wash, destem and core the pears, being sure to remove all seeds. Chop roughly and put in nylon straining bag with raisins. Tie bag and put in primary. Mash pears and pour boiling water over crushed pulp. Add crushed Campden tablet, acid blend, tannin and yeast nutrient. Wait 12 hours and add pectic enzyme. Wait another 12 hours and add yeast. Cover with muslin. Stir daily, squeezing bag gently to extract flavor. After 7 days, remove bag and let drip drain one hour. Do not squeeze. Return drained juice to primary and allow to settle 24 hours. Siphon into glass secondary, fit airlock, and set aside. Rack after two weeks, top up, and refit airlock. Rack again every two months (at least twice) until wine clears. Rack again, stabilize, wait 10 days, and add 1/8 to 1/4 pound sugar (depending on your taste) dissolved in 1/8 cup water. Bottle and age 6-12 months before tasting. Serve chilled. [Adapted from recipe, origin unknown]



My thanks to John and Doretta Moore for the requests.


This page was updated on October 5th, 1998.

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