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BLACK CURRANT WINE (1) [Full Bodied]

Strip currants of stems and leafy matter. Wash thoroughly and crush well in primary fermentation vessel. Boil water and add sugar, stirring to dissolve while returning to boil. Pour over currants and when lukewarm (70-75 degrees F.) add yeast and nutrient. Cover well and set in warm place for 5 days, stirring daily. Strain and press pulp well to extract liquid. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and let stand three months. Rack, then again in two months and bottle. May taste after one year, but improves remarkably with age (3-4 years). [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BLACK CURRANT WINE (2) [Medium Bodied]

Strip currants of stems and leafy matter. Wash thoroughly and crush well in primary fermentation vessel. Cover with boiling water, cover well, and allow to seep overnight. Strain and press pulp well to extract all juice. Measure juice and add sugar in proportion indicated. Stir well to dissolve sugar, add yeast and nutrient, pour into secondary fermentation vessel, and fit airlock. When all fermentation has ceased and liquor cleared, siphon liquor off lees, return to secondaryfermentation vessel, and cork securely. After nine months, rack and bottle. May taste after one year, but improves remarkably after two. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BLACK CURRANT WINE (3) [Light Bodied Dry]

Strip currants of stems and leafy matter. Put currants in nylon jelly-bag and mash or press juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie jelly-bag and put in primary fermentation vessel. Add all ingredients except yeast, stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside 24 hours. Add yeast, cover again, and put in warm place 5 days, stirring daily. Strain juice well from jelly-bag and siphon liquor off sediments into secondary fermentation vessel. Fit airlock and set in cooler place (60-65 degrees F.) one month. Rack, then again in two months. Rack again when clear and bottle. Taste after one year. Improves with age. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BLACK CURRANT (DRIED) WINE

Bring 1 quart water to boil and dissolve sugar. Remove from heat, add currants and cover. After 30 minutes, transfer to primary, add remaining water and all ingredients except yeast. Cover primary and set aside for 12 hours. Add activated yeast and recover primary. When fermentation is vigorous, stir daily for 7 days, strain, and transfer liquid to secondary. Fit airlock and set in cool place (60-65 degrees F.) one month. Rack, top up and refit airlock, then repeat in two months. Rack again when clear. Stabilize, sweeten if desired and bottle. May taste after six months, but improves with age. [Author's own recipe]

BLACKHAWK BERRY WINE

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly and place in nylon jelly-bag. Mash and squeeze out all juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie jelly-bag and place in primary fermentation vessel with all ingredients except yeast. Stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and set aside 5 days, stirring daily. Strain juice from jelly-bag and siphon off sediments into secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper), adding water to bring to shoulder, and fit airlock. Place in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark place for one month. Rack, then again in another two months, and again after three weeks before bottling in dark glass. Allow a year to mature. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BLUEBERRY WINE (1) [Full Bodied]

Bring water to boil, then set aside. Wash and crush blueberries and put in primary fermentation vessel with all ingredients except yeast. Add hot water and stir to dissolve sugar. Cover well and allow to cool to 70-75 degrees F., then add yeast. Stir daily for 5-6 days or until specific gravity is 1.040. Strain out fruit pulp and press. Siphon into secondary fermentation vessel and fit fermentation trap. Rack in three weeks and again in three months. When wine is clear and stable, rack again and bottle. Allow a year to mature. Improves with age. [Adapted from Stanley F. Anderson and Raymond Hull's The Art of Making Wine]

BLUEBERRY WINE (2) [Full Bodied Semi Sec]

Wash and crush blueberries in nylon straining bag and strain juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie top of nylon bag and place in primary fermentation vessel. Stir in all other ingredients except yeast and red grape concentrate. Stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and daily stir ingredients and press pulp in nylon bag to extract flavor. When specific gravity is 1.030 (about 5 days), strain juice from bag and siphon liquor off sediments into glass secondary fermentation vessel. Fit fermentation trap. Rack in three weeks and again in two months. When wine is clear and stable, rack again, add stabilizer and red grape concentrate, and bottle. Allow a year to mature. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]


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BLUEBERRY PORT WINE

Wash and crush blueberries in nylon straining bag and strain juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie top of nylon bag and place in primary fermentation vessel. Stir in all other ingredients except stabilizer, yeast and red grape concentrate. Stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and daily stir ingredients and press pulp in nylon bag to extract flavor. When specific gravity is 1.030 (about 5 days), strain juice from bag and siphon liquor off sediments into glass secondary fermentation vessel. Fit fermentation trap. Rack in three weeks and again in two months. When wine is clear and stable, add red grape concentrate, wine stabilizer and crushed Campden tablet, rack again and bottle. Allow a year to mature. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BROOM WINE (1) [Sweet]

Bring 6 pints water to boil and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Put peel of oranges and lemons (no white pith) into crock and pour hot sugar water over it. Allow to cool to 70 degrees F. (hot water will spoil the flowers and resulting wine) before adding flowers, juice of oranges and lemons, yeast nutrient and yeast. Cover well and leave in a warm place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain through nylon sieve or muslin into secondary fermentation vessel, top up with water to bottom of the neck, and fit a fermentation trap. Leave in warm place for three months and siphon off the lees into clean jar, leaving for another three months. Rack again and bottle. May taste after six months. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BROOM WINE (2) [Medium]

Bring 6 pints water to boil and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Put peel of oranges and lemon (no white pith) into crock and pour hot sugar water over it. Allow to cool to 70 degrees F. (hot water will spoil the flowers and resulting wine) before adding flowers, juice of oranges and lemon, yeast nutrient and yeast. Cover well and leave in a warm place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain through nylon sieve or muslin into secondary fermentation vessel, top up with water to bottom of the neck, and fit a fermentation trap. Leave in warm place for three months and siphon off the lees into clean jar, leaving for another three months. Rack again and bottle. May taste after six months. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BROOM WINE (3) [Dry]

Bring 6 pints water to boil and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Put peel of oranges and lemon (no white pith) into crock and pour hot sugar water over it. Allow to cool to 70 degrees F. (hot water will spoil the flowers and resulting wine) before adding flowers, juice of oranges and lemon, yeast nutrient and yeast. Cover well and leave in a warm place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain through nylon sieve or muslin into secondary fermentation vessel, top up with water to bottom of the neck, and fit a fermentation trap. Leave in warm place for three months and siphon off the lees into clean jar, leaving for another three months. Rack again and bottle. May taste after six months. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]


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