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BANANA WINE [Spiced] (1)

Thinly slice the bananas in their peels. Place in primary fermentation vessel with sugar, chopped raisins, cloves, ginger, and cinnamon. Pour in boiling water and stir to dissolve sugar. When cool (70 degrees F.), add citric acid, grape tannin, and pectic enzyme. Cover well and set in warm place for 24 hours. Add yeast and nutrient and stir twice daily for 10 days. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, add one pint water, fit airlock, and move to cooler (60-65 degrees F.) place. Rack after two months and again after additional two months. When clear, rack again and bottle. May taste after six months, but improves with age. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA WINE [Spiced] (2)

Thinly slice the bananas in their peels, put in grain-bag, and tie closed. Place in 1-1/2 qts. water, bring to boil, then simmer for 30 minutes. Remove grain-bag, allowing to drip-drain only (don't squeeze). Pour liquor in primary fermentation vessel over remaining water and ingredients except yeast and nutrient. Stir to dissolve sugar. When cool (70-75 degrees F.), add Sherry yeast and nutrient, cover well, and stir daily for 5 days. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and move to cooler (60-65 degrees F.) place. Rack after one month and again after additional two months. When clear, rack again and bottle. May taste after six months, but improves with age. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BANANA AND APRICOT MADEIRA-TYPE WINE

Peel bananas and slice thinly, discarding the skins. Place banana slices and chopped apricots in nylon grain-bag, tie end, and boil in 5 pts. water for 30 minutes. Pour juice into primary fermentation vessel and suspend grain-bag over primary fermentation vessel to drain until cool enough to press lightly to extract additional juice, but not pulp. When liquor cools to lukewarm (70-75 degrees F.), add pectic enzyme, yeast and nutrients. Cover well and set aside for two days. Meanwhile, dissolve sugar into 1 pt. boiling water, making syrup. When cool, pour into sterile bottle and set aside. After liquor has sat for two days, add grape concentrate and mix, then pour into secondary fermentation vessel. Add sufficient syrup to bring volume up to 7 pts., then fit airlock. Hereafter, check specific gravity daily and add 1/2 cup syrup each time s.g. drops to 1005 or less. When fermentation ceases completely, allow wine to settle additional 3-4 days, then siphon off sediments. Place secondary fermentation vessel (with airlock attached, in very warm place (100-110 degrees F.). After two days, top up with water and store in this very warm place for 6 months, checking water level in airlock periodically to prevent it from going dry. After 6 months, rack into fresh gallon bottle, add 1 oz. granulated charcoal, cover securely (rubber stopper or plastic wrap secured with rubber band), and allow to return to room temperature for three days. Rack off charcoal and bottle. Allow to age for two years to produce a sweet Madeira-type wine. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those You Buy]

BANANA AND DRIED ELDERBERRY WINE

Thinly slice bananas, with skins, and place in primary fermentation vessel with dried elderberries and sugar. Pour in boiling water and stir to dissolve sugar. When cool, add citric acid, tannin, wine yeast, and nutrient. Cover well and ferment 10 days, stirring daily. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, top up to bottom of neck, and fit airlock. Rack after two months, then again after additional two months. Set aside for additional six months, then rack and bottle. May be sampled in three months, but improves with age. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA AND DRIED FIG WINE

Thinly slice bananas, with skins, and place in primary fermentation vessel with chopped dried figs and sugar. Pour in boiling water and stir to dissolve sugar. When cool, add citric acid, tannin and pectic enzyme. Cover and set aside 24 hours. Add wine yeast and nutrient. Cover again and ferment on the pulp 10 days, stirring daily. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, top up to bottom of neck, and fit airlock. Rack after two months, then again after additional two months. Set aside for additional six months, then rack and bottle. May taste in six months, but improves with age. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA, PEACH, FIG, AND RAISIN SWEET SHERRY

Before beginning, slice bananas (throw away skins), stone and slice peaches and wash raisins. Remove stems, wash figs, and cut in half. Dissolve sugar in 2 cups boiling water, allow to cool, and store in jar for future use. Boil the banana slices in 4 pt. water for 30 minutes. Put peaches, figs and raisins in primary fermentation vessel and strain liquid from bananas over fruit. Add tartaric acid, nutrient, and one cup sugar syrup. Cover and allow to cool, adding pectic enzyme and activated yeast. Cover and allow to ferment three days, stirring daily. Strain liquor carefully through fine nylon sieve and add the grape concentrate. After further 10 days, add 1/2 cup sugar syrup and repeat every three days until all has been added. Add sufficient water to bring to one gallon. When fermentation is complete (additional 10-14 days), rack into large enough secondary fermentation vessel (1-1/2 to 2 gallon) to allow fair amount of air above wine. Plug opening with cotton. Normally, that is the only racking in sherry production, but if pulp particles appear in sediment, rack again after two weeks and plug again with cotton. Store secondary fermentation vessel in cool (55-60 degrees F.) place and leave undisturbed. Flor may form in 3-4 weeks or as late as 4 months. Flor should not form, but if it does, leave undisturbed until all flor has sunk to bottom. Carefully siphon off lees through double layer of fine muslin into bottles. If flor does not form, allow to sit six months, carefully siphon into clean gallon bottle, sweeten with sufficient white grape concentrate or sugar water (1/3 lb. sugar dissolved in one cup water) to top up to one gallon, and then bottle. Allow two or more years to mature. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those You Buy]

BARLEY WINE (1)

Wash the grain and soak overnight in one pint lukewarm water. Strain grain and mince with raisins. Pour 7 pints boiling water over minced grain/raisins, sugar and lemon/orange zest, stirring well to dissolve sugar. Cover well and when lukewarm (70-75 degrees F.) add lemon/orange juice, wine yeast and nutrient. Cover well and set aside in warm place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, top up with water and fit airlock. Rack when clear and again in 3 months before bottling. Allow to age one year before tasting. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BARLEY WINE (2)

Wash grain and soak 24 hours in 1 qt. water. Strain, crush grain, and pour grain and 6 pt. water through grain-bag over primary fermentation vessel.. Tie grain-bag and leave in primary fermentation vessel. Add all other ingredients except yeast to primary fermentation vessel, stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and add wine yeast after 24 hours. Set in warm place, covered, for five days, stirring daily. Strain juice from grain-bag, siphon liquor off sediment into secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock. Rack after three weeks and again in two months. Dissolve 1/4 lb. sugar with 1/2 tsp. wine stabilizer in 1 pt. water and add to wine. When clear, rack again and bottle. Allow to age one year before tasting. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]


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BEET WINE (1) [Heavy Bodied]

Use only young, well washed beetroot, slicing thinly and bringing to boil in 6 pints water with lemon zest, cloves and ginger. Simmer until beetroot is tender, but not mushy. Strain liquid over sugar in primary fermentation vessel, stirring well to dissolve sugar. When lukewarn (70 degrees F.), add lemon juice, yeast and nutrient. Cover well and set in warm place for two days. Pour into dark secondary fermentation vessel (dark glass, or colorless glass wrapped in brown paper), top with remaining water, fit airlock, and move to a cooler place (60-65 degrees F.). Siphon liquor off sediments after two months and again when clear. Bottle in dark glass to preserve color, store in dark place, and sample after one year. Improves with age. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BEET WINE (2) [Medium Bodied]

Wash beetroot well and dice, unpeeled, into 1/4 inch cubes. Bring to boil in half the water with zest of lemon and simmer until beet is tender but not mushy. Strain onto sugar, lemon juice, cloves, and ginger, add rest of water in primary fermentation vessel, and stir well to dissolve sugar. When cooled to 70 degrees F., add yeast and nutrient, cover well, and set in warm place for three days, stirring daily. Strain through coarse muslin into dark secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock. Rack when clear and bottle in dark glasss. Store in dark place and taste after one year. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BEET WINE (3) [Light Bodied]

Wash and peel beets, then dice into 1/4 inch cubes. Place in grain-bag, tie top, and gently boil in 2 qts. water until tender but not mushy. Pour hot liquor over sugar in primary fermentation vessel and stir well to dissolve sugar. Put grain-bag and all remaining ingredients except yeast into liquor, cover, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover well, and stir daily for 5 days. Strain juice lightly from grain-bag and siphon liquor off sediments into dark secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock. Rack after 3 weeks and again after another 2 months. When clear, rack final time, add 1/2 tsp. wine stabilizer and 1/4 lb. sugar, and bottle in dark glass. Allow to age one year in dark place. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BEET [Sugar] WINE

Wash and peel sugar beets, then slice thinly. Place in grain-bag, tie top, and gently boil in two qts. water until tender but not mushy. Pour over sugar in primary fermentation vessel and stir well to dissolve sugar. Put grain-bag and all remaining ingredients except yeast in primary fermentation vessel, cover, and set aside for 24 hours. Add wine yeast, cover well, and stir daily for 5 days. Strain juice lightly from grain-bag and siphon liquor off sediments into dark secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and move to cooler (60-65 degrees F.) place. Rack after 3 weeks and again after additional 2 months. When clear, rack and bottle in dark glass. Allow one year to age in dark place. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemakers Recipe Handbook]

BEET, APRICOT AND RAISIN DRY SHERRY

Before beginning, scrub and chop beets, apricots and raisins. Dissolve sugar in 1-1/4 cups boiling water. Allow sugar syrup to cool and store in jar for future use. Boil beets in 6 pt. water for 30 minutes. Strain over chopped apricots and raisins in primary fermentation vessel. Add cream of tartar, gypsum, nutrient, and 1/2 cup sugar syrup. Cover and allow to cool, then add pectic enzyme and activated yeast, cover, and ferment on the pulp four days, stirring twice daily. Strain through fine nylon sieve, pressing lightly, and add grape concentrate. After 10 days, add 1/2 cup sugar syrup and then another 1/2 cup sugar syrup whenever S.G. drops to 1.005 or less (approximately every three days). When all sugar syrup is added, add sufficient water to bring to one gallon. When fermentation is complete (additional 10-14 days), rack into large enough secondary fermentation vessel (1-1/2 to 2 gallon) to allow fair amount of air above wine. Plug opening with cotton. Normally, that is the only racking in sherry production, but if pulp particles appear in sediment, rack again after two weeks and plug again with cotton. Store secondary fermentation vessel in cool (55-60 degrees F.) place and leave undisturbed. Flor may form in 3-4 weeks or as late as 4 months. If flor forms, leave undisturbed until all flor has sunk to bottom. Carefully siphon off lees through double layer of fine muslin into bottles. If flor does not form, allow to sit six months, carefully siphon into clean gallon bottle, sweeten with sufficient white grape concentrate or sugar water (1/3 lb. sugar dissolved in one cup water) to top up to one gallon, and then bottle in dark glass and store in dark cabinet. This sherry must age three years before tasting, but will improve with further aging. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those You Buy]

BEET AND PARSNIP WINE

Wash and thinly slice the beets and parsnips. Bring to boil in 6 pts. water and simmer until tender but not mushy. Strain liquor into primary fermentation vessel over sugar and stir to dissolve. When cool, add all remaining ingredients except yeast. Cover and in 24 hours add yeast, stir, cover well, and set aside two days to begin fermentation. Pour into dark secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and move to cooler place. Siphon off sediments after two months and again when clear. Bottle in dark glass and allow to age in dark place for one year. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BLACKBERRY WINE (1) [Heavy Bodied]

Wash berries thoroughly in colander, then crush in bowl, trasnfer to primary fermentation vessel, and pour 7 pts. boiling water over must. Allow to seep for two days, then strain through nylon sieve onto the sugar. Stir well to dissolve sugar, add pectic enzyme, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast and nutrient, cover, and set aside 5-6 days, stirring daily. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper), adding water bring to shoulder, and fit airlock. Place in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark place for three months. Rack, allow another two months to finish, then rack again and bottle in dark glass. Allow 6 months to age, a year to mature. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BLACKBERRY WINE (2) [Medium Bodied Dry]

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly and place in nylon jelly-bag. Mash and squeeze out all juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie jelly-bag and place in primary fermentation vessel with all ingredients except yeast. Stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and set aside 5 days, stirring daily. Strain juice from jelly-bag and siphon off sediments into secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper), adding water to bring to shoulder, and fit airlock. Place in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark place for three weeks. Rack, allow another two months to finish, then rack again and bottle in dark glass. Allow a year to mature to a nice semi-sec. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BLACKBERRY WINE (3) [Medium Bodied Sweet]

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly in colander, then crush in bowl, transfer to primary fermentation vessel, and add gallon of boiling water, mixing thoroughly. When lukewarn (70 degrees F.), add yeast, cover, and set in warm (70-75 degrees F.) place 4-5 days, stirring daily. Strain throught very fine nylon sieve or double thickness of muslin onto sugar and nutrient. Stir well to dissolve sugar and pour into secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper) to shoulder, and fit airlock. Ferment excess liquor in small bottle fitted with airlock or covered with plastic wrap held by rubber band. After all foaming has ceased (6-7 days), top up with excess liquor and place in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark place for three months. Rack, allow another two months to finish, then rack again and bottle in dark glass. Allow 6 months to age, a year to mature. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BLACKBERRY WINE (4) [Light Bodied Sweet]

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly in colander, then crush in bowl, transfer to primary fermentation vessel, and add water, mixing thoroughly. Allow to seep overnight, then strain through nylon sieve onto the sugar. Stir well to dissolve sugar, add yeast and nutrient, cover, and set in warm (70-75 degrees F.) place one week, stirring daily. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper), adding water to bring to shoulder, and fit airlock. Place in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark place for three months. Rack, allow another two months to finish, then rack again and bottle in dark glass. Allow 6 months to age, a year to mature. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BLACKBERRY AND BANANA MADEIRA-TYPE WINE

Peel bananas and slice thinly, discarding the skins. Boil the banana slices in 5 pts. water for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, crush the blackberries in primary fermentation vessel. Strain the hot liquor over the crushed blackberries into primary fermentation vessel and add nutrient. When liquor cools to lukewarm (70-75 degrees F.), add pectic enzyme and yeast. Cover well and ferment on the pulp for two days. Meanwhile, dissolve sugar into 1 pt. boiling water, making syrup. When cool, pour into sterile bottle and set aside. After must has fermented two days, strain through fine nylon sieve add press pulp lightly. Add the grape concentrate and mix, then pour into secondary fermentation vessel. Add sufficient syrup to bring volume up to 7 pts., then fit airlock. Hereafter, check specific gravity daily and add 1/2 cup syrup each time s.g. drops to 1005 or less. When fermentation ceases completely, allow wine to settle additional 3-4 days, then siphon off sediments. Place secondary fermentation vessel (with airlock attached, in very warm place (100-110 degrees F.). After two days, top up with water and store in this very warm place for 6 months, checking water level in airlock periodically to prevent it from going dry. After 6 months, rack into fresh gallon bottle, add 1 oz. granulated charcoal, cover securely (rubber stopper or plastic wrap secured with rubber band), and allow to return to room temperature for three days. Rack off charcoal and bottle. Allow to age for two years to produce a sweet Madeira-type wine. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those You Buy]


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A correction was posted September 27th, 2007.


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