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Landscape Gardening and Related Components


If it's planned, planted and arranged, it's a garden. If it encompasses the whole, it's landscaped.



I happen to enjoy gardening very much. There is something supremely satisfying about taking a plot of raw soil and transforming it into a place of aesthetic beauty or factory for fresh vegetables. I don't particularly enjoy the initial removal of grass or weeds from the plot, but I enjoy the rest of it very much.

To me, gardening has three meanings. The first is a place for growing vegetables. This meaning stems from my childhood, as my father always put in a vegetable garden whenever and wherever we moved (and we moved often!). The second is a place for growing flowers and ornamental plants. This too stems from my childhood, as my mother always planted flowerbeds while my aunt had a garden. The difference was that my aunt's garden was laid out as a total, integrated area for both flowers and foliage plants, with paths and a sitting area and even a birdbath and arbor. I loved playing in her garden, but it always made her nervous when I did. The third thing that comes to mind when I think of garden is an area dedicated to showing off individual plants or groupings of plants (including trees), rocks, and even ground covers such as sand and gravel. This comes from my many visitations to Japan (and one to China), where the concept of a garden is one of balance, serenity, and an almost sublimely aesthetic perfection. The well designed and maintained Japanese garden is extremely pleasing to me. And yet, the formal gardens of Europe and elsewhere do not affect me the same way. To me, these are simply the second kind of garden on a much grander scale, and they do not pop into my mind as distinctly different entities when I think of garden.

My wife and I recently bought a small spread in Pleasanton, Texas, 30 miles south of San Antonio. It has no garden of any type, and we aim to change that -- gradually and systematically. We're developing a plan for the transformation, and in the plan we are attempting to integrate various things. First and foremost, several score of very mature live oak trees dominate the property and must continue to do so. Secondly, the house must be dealt with as an immovable object to be complimented, highlighted, and accentuated by the plantings we undertake. Thirdly, there are areas involving fences, sidewalks, outbuildings, and corners which are rather unaesthetic presently, and these must be transformed into places of beauty and harmony. In my mind, all of this integrates to form a requirement for landscaped gardens. In some areas, the garden element will just be a bordered planting area surrounding a tree or two, or perhaps a small grouping of foliage plants in a corner. In other areas, the grass will be removed completely, plantings will be carefully selected and arranged, and both living and non-living ground covers will be set down. We have an area that we plan on xeriscaping and an area we plan on planting with plants demanding a higher than natural water requirement than this area enjoys. And we have an area that already contains several fruit trees and will become a mini-orchard. Finally, we have a fenced area in "the back 40" that once contained vegetable beds. I aim to restore it to that use. We have already begun work on several areas, but foresee many years of work ahead. And that, I think, is how it should be. No garden should ever be completed, except perhaps the Japanese garden (I've seen Japanese gardens which have been maintained in their present state for hundreds of years, and I see no way to improve upon them). But even when the design is finished and the detailed planting and landscaping schema are set and growing, the garden must be maintained. Once begun, a garden is for life or to be abandoned. I wish it to be a lifetime endeavor of love for me.

The groupings of links to gardening and related sites below are arranged as they are for a reason. The inclusion of specialties such as bonsai and orchids are there because for many years I raised both. When I moved from San Francisco to San Antonio in 1992, I gave away about six dozen of each. I have no immediate intent to begin raising either of them again, but I still possess a fierce interest in both. Other specialties are included because we are investigating or utilizing the resources listed, and these links are derived from our bookmarks. We hope you too will benefit from them.


LANDSCAPE GARDENING and RELATED LINKS


Bonsai Links


American Bonsai Society
Bonsai (1)
Bonsai (2)
Bonsai On The Web
Bonsai and Suiseki
Bonsai, Penjing, Japanese & Chinese Garden Links
Dallas Bonsai Garden
Internet Bonsai Club
Japanese Gardens
The Bonsai Styling and Advice Corner
The Online Bonsai Icon Collection
Viewing Stones/Suiseki


Formal Gardens


Denver Botanic Gardens
San Antonio Botanical Gardens


Gardening Books and Magazines


The Amateurs' Digest
(The) American Cottage Gardener Magazine
Books that Work
Garden Gate Magazine
Southern Living Magazine
Sunset Magazine
TALI Books, Etc.
Texas Plant Disease Handbook
Traditional Gardening


Gardening Bulletin Boards / Newgroups


aus.gardens
MACN Garden-Talk
Mail List
news:rec.gardens
Tree-House


Gardening Organizations and Societies


American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta
American Bamboo Society
American Bonsai Society
(The) American Dianthus Society
American Hemerocallis Society
American Horticultural Society
American Orchid Society
American Rose Society
(The) Botanical Society of America
(The) Cactus and Succulent Society of America
Historic Iris Preservation Society
International Society of Arboriculture
Pacific Northwest Chapter of the ISA
New England Wild Flower Society
Vancouver Island Rock and Alpine Garden Society


General Gardening Articles and Features


article by C. Colston Burrell.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Southern Living Magazine: Hands-Off Irrigation
Sunset Magazine: If Your Soil is Downright Bad
Sunset Magazine: Poor Soil? Here's a Quick Way to Enrich It
Garden Gate Magazine: (The) Power of Mulch
Garden Gate Magazine: Slow Watering
Garden Gate Magazine: Watering Your Lawn -- Irrigation Made Easy


Herbaria Sites


Connecticut College's Charles B. Graves Herbarium
Gray Herbarium, Harvard University
S. M. Tracy Herbarium
University of Florida Herbarium
US National Herbarium (orchid collection)


Herbs and Herbal Gardening


A Small-Scale Agriculture Alternative
Bach Flower Remedies
FAQ for medicinal herbs
Henriette's Herbal Homepage
Herb FTP
Herb Web Page
HerbalGram>
Herbal Hall
(The) Herbal Sage
Herbal Touch
HerbaNet
Herbology
Herbal Touch
History, Stories, Sources, Recipes, and Growing Tips for Herbs and Spices
Howie Brounstein's Home Page
Ithaca Garden Herb Search
Michael Moore's Homepage
Old Herbals and Materia Medica


Landscaping Articles


Sunset Magazine: A Garden Entry Brimming with Blooms
Southern Living Magazine: A Garden Groomed for Bouquets
Sunset Magazine: A Passion for Heathers
Sunset Magazine: A Posar -- Gazebo for Mediterranean-Style Garden
Sunset Magazine: A Shady Forest Glen in Vancouver, B.C.
Garden Gate Magazine: A Silver Lining in Every Mound
Southern Living Magazine: Azaleas in Five Easy Steps
Sunset Magazine: Buddleia: Nectar Bar for Butterflies
Sunset Magazine: Build a Vegetable Factory
Southern Living Magazine: Bulbs -- This End Up
Garden Gate Magazine: Butterfly Tree
Sunset Magazine: (The) Colorful Magic of Koi
Garden Gate Magazine: Creating a Berm
Southern Living: Custom Landscape Plans
Southern Living Magazine: Deceptively Easy Topiary
Sunset Magazine: Designing with Herbs
Southern Living Magazine: Don't Give Up on Roses
Garden Gate Magazine: Double-Cropping Your Vegetables
Garden Gate Magazine: Drip Water Hanging Baskets
Sunset Magazine: Easy Care Herb Pot
Garden Gate Magazine: Easy Trellis
Garden Gate Magazine: Easy Way to Hang a Windowbox Without Harming Your House
Garden Gate Magazine: Enriching Clay Soil
Sunset Magazine: Entry Garden Brimming with Blooms
Garden Gate Magazine: Entry Gardens
Garden Gate Magazine: Exterior Decorating
Sunset Magazine: Five First-Time Stumbling Blocks...
Southern Living Magazine: Flowering Vines for Entryways
Southern Living Magazine: Focus on a Fountain
Garden Gate Magazine: Forcing Bulbs
Southern Living Magazine: Garden Gateways
Garden Gate Magazine: Garden Layout Made Easy
Garden Gate Magazine: Gardening in Flood Zones
Sunset Magazine: Gopher Resistent Gardening
Traditional Gardening: Historic Apples for the Home Orchard
Garden Gate Magazine: Indicator Plants for Watering
Southern Living Magazine: Kinder Killers
Sunset Magazine: Knee-High Roses All Summer
Traditional Gardening: (The) Knot Garden
Sunset Magazine: Landscaping for Fire Safety
Sunset Magazine: Landscaping for Wildfire Safety
Sunset Magazine: Landscaping, South African Style
Sunset Magazine: Landscaping with Bananas
Garden Gate Magazine: Lawn Care -- Doing Two Jobs at Once
Sunset Magazine: Luscious Lavender
Fine Gargening Online: Make a Big Splash with a Tiny Water Garden
Garden Gate Magazine: Making a Bog Garden
Garden Gate Magazine: Making Armaryllis Stand Up Straight
Garden Gate Magazine: Midsummer Rose Garden Pruning
Garden Gate Magazine: Moon Garden
Sunset Magazine: New Life for Old Concrete
Southern Living Magazine: Old Fashioned Bloomers
Cricket Hill Garden: Peonies in China
Southern Living Magazine: Pick a Picket Fence
Gardens and Landscapes: Plant Selector
Sunset Magazine: Planning a Garden for Cutting
Garden Gate Magazine: Pruning Shrubs into Trees
Sunset Magazine: Rearranging Your Plants (for Fire Safety)
Garden Gate Magazine: Rescuing Trees During Droughts
Garden Gate Magazine: Reshaping Damaged Trees
Sunset Magazine: Robust Rosemary
Southern Living Magazine: Rooting Cuttings are Easy
Sunset Magazine: Rosemary: 10 Good Choices
Southern Living Magazine: Rose Scent-sations
Garden Gate Magazine: Satellite Dish Fountain
Sunset Magazine: Secrets of Hanging Baskets
Sunset Magazine: Secrets of the Master Gardeners -- Barclay
Sunset Magazine: Secrets of the Master Gardeners -- Heims
Sunset Magazine: Secrets of the Master Gardeners -- Kelaids
Sunset Magazine: Secrets of the Master Gardeners -- Wignad
Southern Living Magazine: Select a Disease-Resistant Rose
Garden Gate Magazine: Shady Areas for Sunny Borders
Sunset Magazine: Simple Steps for Boosting Fruit Production
Southern Living Magazine: Simple Steps to Pruning Crepe Myrtle
Sunset Magazine: Size Up Your Choices at the Nursery
Sunset Magazine: Slope Strategies
Sunset Magazine: Sonoma County, California -- From Japanese Maples to Perennials and Roses
Gardens and Landscapes: Staking Container Grown Trees
Sunset Magazine: Stewartias with Regal Form, Summer Flowers
Southern Living Magazine: Stone Wall Basics
Sunset Magazine: Summer Pruning for More Apples and Pears
Gardens and Landscapes: Surveying Your Site
Garden Gate Magazine: Tomato Cage Birdbath
Southern Living Magazinen: Transplanting and Rearrange Your Landscape
Garden Gate Magazine: Tree Peonies
Cricket Hill Garden: Tree Peonies -- Detailed Planting Instructions
Cricket Hill Garden: Tree Peonies -- Site Selection
Garden Gate Magazine: Tree Peonies -- Tips from the Pros
Southern Living Magazine: Trumpet Honeysuckle Minds its Manners
Sunset Magazine: Tulips Year After Year, Naturally
Garden Gate Magazine: Twist Tie Trellis
Gardens and Landscapes: Unappreciated Plant of the Month: Vinca
Gardens and Landscapes: Understanding Plant Names
Sunset Magazine: Unforgettable Garden Fragrances
Sunset Magazine: Unthirsty Plants by the Pool
Sunset Magazine: Whimsical California Garden
Garden Gate Magazine: Window Box Designs


Lawns Articles


Southern Living Magazine: Babying My New Lawn
Southern Living Magazine: Buffalo grass
Sunset Magazine: Drip Irrigation for Lawns
Southern Living Magazine: Fall Lawn Fix-Ups
Traditional Gardening: (The) Great American Lawn
Southern Living Magazine: (The) Lawn's Worst Enemies
Southern Living Magazine: Putting-Green Perfect Zoysia Grass
Southern Living Magazine: Some Lawn Basics
Southern Living Magazine: Southern Lawn Maintenance Calendar
Southern Living Magazine: Watch for Winter Weeds


Mushrooms in the Yard and Garden


A Short 'Shroom Primer
Bay Area Fungi Index
Eating Mushrooms
Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms
Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America
Index to Mycology Resources
Mushrooms 101
Mushroom Heaven
Mushroom identification
Mushrooms of Northeastern North America
Mycology Resources
Mycology Resources: Mushrooms (Cornell U.)
Mycology Resources: Mushrooms (U. of Kansas)
Myko Web
Tom Volk's Gopher Menu of Mushrooms
Wild mushrooms


Orchid Links


Amazing World of Orchids
Orchid Conservatory Home Page
Orchid Maniacs
Orchid Web
Pollinia: Home Page
The Orchid House
Yamamoto Orchid Index


Other Gardening Sites


A & C'S Gardening at Home
Ambrose Gardens
American Rose Society Home Page
Amy's Garden Page
Agriculture B2B Directory
(The) Bay Area Gardenerbr> Bluestone Perennials
Botanique
Butterfly Garden Plants
Cactus and Succulent Plant Mall
Coleus
Companion Plants
(The) Cook's Garden
Cricket Hill Garden Gate
Cyberplaza Travel Center/Gardening Sites
Deer Resistant Plant List
Edible Landscaping
Favela Greenhouse
Fine Gardening Online
Floral Exchange.com
Florida Wildflower Showcase
Flower Garden
Free Landscaping Ideas Garden Aesthetics
(The) Garden Exchange
Garden Gate
Garden Gate: Roots of Botanical Names
Garden Net
Garden Web
(The) Garden Window
Gardeners' Advantage
Gardening.com
Gardening Launch Pad
Gardens & Graphics
Gardenscape
General Hydroponics
Glasshouse Works- Rare Plants & Collectors
The Gourmet Gardener
(The) Grow Zone
Home and Garden A to Z
Horticulture Solutions
I Can Garden
Illinois Cooperative Extension / Horticultural Solutions
Internet Directory for Botany -- Alphabetical List
Internet Directory for Botany -- Gardening
Japanese Gardens
Master Gardener
Mike's Back in the Yard
Mt. Tahoma Nursery
(The) Orchid Conservatory
(The) Orchid Weblopedia
Organic Gardener's Web
Pacific Northwest Gardening
Perry's Perennial Pages
Rochester Gardening
Selected Plants for Special Situations
Southern Perenials and Herbs
Succulent Plant Page
Tree Doctor
USDA National Database of Plants
Vermont Perennial Display Gardens
(The) WebGarden
Wild-flowers
Windowsill Orchids


Other Sites of Biological Interest


Directorio de Links de Todo el Mundo Relacionados con las Plantas
Directorio de recursos relacionados con las plantas
Internet Directory for Botany
Scienza e Tecnologia
Tele-Garden at USC


Sources of Plants, Seeds, Cuttings


AgriSeek
Burpee
(The) Burrow
Elite Farmer: Bulbs Vines Mushrooms Plants Trees for sale/info
Dutch Bulb
Floyd Cove Nursery Catalog
For Farmers
Fratelli Ingegnoli seeds
Garden Centre
Garden Escape
Gardeners' Advantage
Gardener's Supply Co.
Gardening Unlimited
Geerlings Bulbs USA
Harris Seeds
SBE's Universal Seedbank
(The) Seed Guild
TyTy Online Plant & Tree Nursery


Texas Gardening Checklists


Sunset Magazine: March Garden Checklist
Sunset Magazine: April Garden Checklist
Sunset Magazine: May Garden Checklist
Sunset Magazine: June Garden Checklist
Sunset Magazine: July Garden Checklist
Sunset Magazine: August Garden Checklist
Sunset Magazine: September Garden Checklist


Xeriscaping Articles


Sunset Magazine: Salvaging Native Plants
Sunset Magazine: Heeding the Call of the Wild


Xeriscaping Links


A Sense of Place (Native Plants)
Mt. Tahoma Nursery
San Antonio Botanical Gardens
Southern Perenials and Herbs
Texas Plant Disease Handbook
USDA National Database of Plants
Wildflower Images
Xeriscape Plants



Last update was March 12th, 2008.

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